in

Three DIY Deer Blind Reviews, Ideas, & Recommendations



Thinking about DIY building your next deer blind? Watch this first so you can learn from my mistakes, and maybe get a few ideas on how to design and build your next “dream home”. Let’s review three DIY blinds, ranging from one to over twenty years old.
Video for purchased blind windows: https://youtu.be/cFbsPsnp9_Y
And here are a couple other deer blind related videos for your viewing pleasure:
Best way to heat a deer blind: https://youtu.be/KF0zboFhdFA
Redneck Brand Hunting Blind Review: https://youtu.be/PLaC_RQjj0c

What do you think?

Written by HuntingBP

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

GIPHY App Key not set. Please check settings

31 Comments

  1. The floor systems built with metal joist hangers are not really safe. also the post should be resting under the floor joists' supporting gerder ( beam). Wood resting on wood, is much safer than relying on short-thick-and 1.5 ' nails. Whenever you here on the news about a failed floor system at the beach for instance, the salt rotted (galvanized) hanger nails fail, and/or hanger supported beams-nails- give away from the horizontal supported "relying on nails" building method. The building codes need over all severely.

  2. I’m trying to decide on whether to buy a redneck buck palace or build a 6×6 with treated plywood and such and I can’t decide what do you think is a better idea? The red neck blind is a good amount more for me

  3. Your last blind has OSB!!! OSB is a great material if covered properly with outdoor paint or siding. Treated 3/4” plywood is way too expensive for the average guy. Nice work on the blind though. Wish you many years of warm and comfortable hunting.

  4. What size are the wooden studs in blind #3, the one wrapped in metal? Also, before I put metal, whether treated or OSB, I paint the outside, then metal. It seals almost forever. Please advise on stud size, thank you.

  5. We use a flexible hose oil funnel up in the stand, secured in a corner, that goes into an empty fiber cable cover (orange tubing) and run it down one leg of the stand, and bury it about 2 ft into the ground. Perfect pee station without creating a bunch of smell when your living off that coffee early in the AM to stay warm.

  6. You just got a new subscriber just for the “I don’t want to create work”… me either my friend!

    I’ve built a few different ones over the years and seeing them toppled over just makes me cringe every time….

    I have my forever property, I’m getting some age on me now and I want a warm blind that is durable and easy to maintain for the old Dave coming down the pike.

    But I love the satisfaction of building my own. I would love to have the dimensions of that last one!

    Thanks and take care!
    Dave

  7. I have several portable blinds which are good for mobility. Problem here are bears lol. This method would limit mobility but certainly solve the bear issue.

  8. my gpas dads blind was built in the 1960s and its been destroyed 3 time rotting tree fall an transportation problems but rebuilt it its history 100s of bucks shoot out of it

  9. I had my metal roofing overhanging like you have but I had to cut them down to a 3'' overhang on the sides……… the wind was catching them and making all kinds of noise.

  10. Any of my blinds that are fully enclosed on the back side, I put the backs against a tree. Then I take a 1/4" cable, and bolt to the blind, around the tree, then bolted to the blind again. Leaving plenty of slack in the cable to allow the tree to move, and grow without hurting the tree. Also, cut a chunk of old garden hose, and runt the cable through it before attaching it to your blind. This way, it won't rub the bark off the tree.

Deer Stand Plans 4×6

Building A Duck Blind | Part 1